Fake identification on dating websites

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“A lot of the online dating fraudsters we know are abroad.They're in West Africa, Eastern Europe and it's very difficult for British law enforcement to take action against them in those jurisdictions,” Steve Profitt, Deputy Head of Action Fraud explains.Scammers take advantage of people looking for romantic partners, often via dating websites, apps or social media by pretending to be prospective companions.They play on emotional triggers to get you to provide money, gifts or personal details.Nancy*, a 47-year-old single mother from North Yorkshire was conned out of over £350,000 that way: “I wasn't comfortable, and then I got so far in I couldn't get myself out, and I didn't want to walk away having lost £50,000 or what-have-you, so you keep going in the hope that you're wrong and this person is genuine,” she explained to the BBC.Nancy is now facing bankruptcy, and although her case is extreme, the average victim of online dating fraud loses £10,000 according to Action Fraud.Tiersa writes for enjoys writing about todays modern dating dilemmas and the unseen quirky side of relationships and dating sites.

They will painstakingly craft a fake profile and begin targeting people that are looking for love.One of the most common techniques is to build up trust with the person by messaging for weeks or even months before suddenly having an emergency - the fake person being mugged but their daughter needing urgent surgery, for example - and asking for money.But then they suddenly need money for rent too, then food, then medical fees, and it can quickly escalate.Around 7.8 million UK adults used online dating sites in 2016, up from just 100,000 in 2000.But just as dating app users are at an all-time high, so is the number of people becoming victims of online dating fraud. It turns out that the crippling fear of an awkward first date is the least of your troubles.A fraud is sweeping online dating sites, according to a special report in this month’s issue of Glamour Magazine.After discovering that his headshot consistently showed in hoax dating profiles (thanks to a Google alert), Army Master Sgt. “Over the past few years, I’ve seen these scammers use all kinds of photos removed from open Facebook pages, blogs, official military websites, and command pages,” he wrote in a blog post last month.“I’ve also seen my own photos and name used.” (The image of Grisham that was used by scammers is pictured, left) With a few of the largest player like OKCupid, Match, and others, there are precautionary measures in place.Librarians and educators need to be able to illustrate to students and users alike that websites cannot always be trusted to provide truthful and accurate data.This page provides examples of websites that are full of lies, inaccuracies or false information - either for amusement or for more worrying reasons.

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